For historical reasons Bulgarian society has an unusually rich folk culture. Music, dance, song, ritual, customs, holidays and past times are deeply integrated. Within this fertile context, Bulgarian folk dance has developed exceptionally elaborate forms without fragmenting from folk culture as a whole nor synthesizing a technique exclusive only to trained dancers.

In ancient times the therritory of modern Bulgaria was known as Thrace. Although the Thracians left no written records, we know a great deal about their society and culture from Greek writings and archaeology finds. Throughout the ages various peoples came in large groups to settle within the already populous therritory: Slavs, Gypsies, Turks, Armenians, Vlachs and most notably Proto-Bulgarians who gave the nation its name and identity.

Dances, songs and musical styles vary from region to region; often from village to village. Thrace, Rodopi, Dobrudza, Macedonia, Shop and Mizia are the main folkloric regions, but in the areas within them are found other distinctive ones like- Graovo(Shop), Varna(Dobrudza ), Strandza(Thrace) etc.

Bulgarian music, both vocal and instrumental is particularly unique in its use of tempos, which combine double and triple beats within a bar, thus producing time signatures such as 7/8,11/16,9/8,13/16,5/8 etc. These rhythms are actually the norm throughout Bulgaria, and not perceived as exceptional.

Bulgarian Instrumental Ensembles are comprised of a range of instruments both modern- such as accordion, clarinet, violin etc. - and ancient. The latter consists of an end-blown flute (kaval), bagpipe(gayda), long-necked mandolin(tambura), double-headed drum, gadulka  etc. These instruments are usually made by village craftsmen entirely of local materials such as ox-horn, goat skin and fruit trees.

Dances, songs and musical styles still vary from region to region; often from village to village. Even today Bulgarians can identify the musical culture of each of the nations region. During Communist era the government wishing to show the world our identity, created a network of ensembles throughout the country, not only dance ensembles but also singing and music ones.

Dance ensembles aim to establish a style, which resembles, through authenticity and variety  the traditional music-and dance folklore. Thus the classical basis has been enriched and changed, although retaining the power of the original source.

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